Que en pregunta lleva tilde

Which ones or which ones

However, in some interrogative sentences, the «que», depending on whether it has a stress or not, means one thing or another. Keep in mind that the difference is minimal and you have to pay attention to the pronunciation to differentiate them more easily. Let’s see it through an example:
In front of the accented «qué» is the unstressed «que», which can be either a relative pronoun: Her son, who had fallen in the park, was crying, or a conjunction: He told me he didn’t want to see me anymore. These words are known as homographs, since they are spelled the same but have different meanings. Both are unstressed.

What or what examples

El is a definite article that is generally used preceding a noun or noun phrase. He, on the other hand, is a personal pronoun used to refer to the person, animal or thing spoken of.
He is the singular form of the third person masculine personal pronoun; it is used to designate the person, animal or thing spoken of, as opposed to the speaker and the addressee. It is a tonic word, therefore it is written with a diacritical accent.

What and what

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Who or whom

However, in some interrogative sentences, the «que», depending on whether it has a stress or not, means one thing or another. Keep in mind that the difference is minimal and you have to pay attention to the pronunciation to differentiate them more easily. Let’s see it through an example:
In front of the accented «qué» is the unstressed «que», which can be either a relative pronoun: Her son, who had fallen in the park, was crying, or a conjunction: He told me he didn’t want to see me anymore. These words are known as homographs, since they are spelled the same but have different meanings. Both are unstressed.